Ernest Borgnine Biography Current News Profile Wife Childhood.


NAME: Ernest Borgnine
OCCUPATION: Film Actor, Theater Actor, Television Actor
BIRTH DATE: January 24, 1917
DEATH DATE: July 08, 2012
EDUCATION: Randall School of Dramatic Art

As a young actor, Ernest Borgnine landed a part in Harvey on Broadway, which led to many appearances in early television shows. In 1951, he headed to Hollywood, where he made his feature debut in The Whistle at Eaton Falls. Two years later, he landed a role in From Here to Eternity, but he soon found himself typecast as an onscreen tough guy. In 1955, he was relieved to land the leading role of a sympathetic everyman in Marty. His prolific career acting in both movies and television spanned over five decades.
Early Life.
 
Actor Ernest Borgnine was born Ermes Effron Borgnine, on January 24, 1917, in Hamden, Connecticut. His parents, Charles and Anna, immigrated to America from Italy at the turn of the century. The family settled in Connecticut, where Borgnine attended public school in New Haven. Upon graduating from high school, in 1935, he joined the Navy as an apprentice seaman.After 10 years in service, Borgnine returned to Connecticut and continued his education by enrolling at the Randall School of Dramatic Art in Hartford. Beginning in 1946, he spent four years honing his craft at the Barter Theatre in Abington, Virginia. While there, Borgnine encountered his first professional acting experience, initially appearing in bit parts, and eventually graduating to starring roles.

The young character actor soon landed a part on Broadway in the comedy Harvey, which led to appearances on New York television shows like Philco Television Playhouse and Captain Video and His Video Rangers. In 1951, he headed west to Hollywood, where he made his feature debut in the docudrama The Whistle at Eaton Falls.

Two years later, Borgnine landed the role of a lifetime in From Here to Eternity, opposite A-list actors Montgomery Clift, Frank Sinatra, Deborah Kerr, and Burt Lancaster. His brutish portrayal of Fatso Judson earned him critical acclaim and established him as a bankable actor.With the success of the film, Hecht-Lancaster Productions signed Borgnine to a seven-year contract.

Borgnine soon found himself typecast as a brooding villain in such roles as Strabo in 1954's Roman epic Demetrius and the Gladiators, opposite Susan Hayward and Victor Mature. Later that year, he was placed in similar "tough guy" parts, including Johnny Guitar with Joan Crawford, and the Western Vera Cruz with Gary Cooper.

Oscar-winning film star Ernest Borgnine dies in LA at age 95.Ernest Borgnine, who created a variety of memorable characters in both movies and television and won the best-actor Oscar for his role as a lovesick butcher in "Marty" in 1955, died Sunday. He was 95.Borgnine's longtime spokesman, Harry Flynn, told The Associated Press that Borgnine died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles with his family by his side.

A prolific and talented character actor, Borgnine was known for gruff, villainous roles such as the heavy who beats up Frank Sinatra in "From Here to Eternity" and one of the bad guys who harasses Spencer Tracy in "Bad Day at Black Rock."Borgnine, who earned a salary of $5,000 for playing his Academy-Award winning role Marty, once said "I would have done it for nothing."Borgnine, who was born Ermes Effron Borgnino on Jan. 24, 1917 in Hamden, Conn., began acting after serving in the Navy during World War II. He made his film debut in 1951's "Whistle at Eaton Falls" before winning an Academy Award four years later. He appeared in other notable films including "Jubal," "Flight of the Phoenix," "The Dirty Dozen,""The Wild Bunch," "The Poseidon Adventure," "Johnny Guitar," and "Escape from New York."

"No Stanislavsky. I don't chart out the life histories of the people I play," Borgnine told The New York Times in 1973 when asked about his acting methods. "If I did, I'd be in trouble. I work with my heart and my head, and naturally emotions follow."Sometimes he prayed, he said, or just reflected on character-appropriate thoughts. "If none of that works," he added, "I think to myself of the money I'm making."

He was also known as the Navy officer in the television series "McHale's Navy," which aired from 1962-66. Younger audiences would know him as the voice of Mermaid Man in "Spongebob Squarepants."Borgnine earned an Emmy Award nomination at age 92 for his work on the series "ER," and was honored with the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award in 2011."The Oscar made me a star, and I'm grateful," AP reports that Borgnine told an interviewer in 1966. "But I feel had I not won the Oscar I wouldn't have gotten into the messes I did in my personal life."

The actor was married five times, including to singer Ethel Merman, who became his third wife in 1964. The marriage barely lasted a month.He is survived by his fifth wife, Tova Traesnaes — whom he married in 1973 —his children Christofer, Nancee and Sharon Borgnine; a stepson, David Johnson; six grandchildren; and his sister, Evelyn Verlardi.

As a young actor, Ernest Borgnine landed a part in Harvey on Broadway, which led to many appearances in early television shows. In 1951, he headed to Hollywood, where he made his feature debut in The Whistle at Eaton Falls. Two years later, he landed a role in From Here to Eternity, but he soon found himself typecast as an onscreen tough guy. In 1955, he was relieved to land the leading role of a sympathetic everyman in Marty. His prolific career acting in both movies and television spanned over five decades.
Early Life

Actor Ernest Borgnine was born Ermes Effron Borgnine, on January 24, 1917, in Hamden, Connecticut. His parents, Charles and Anna, immigrated to America from Italy at the turn of the century. The family settled in Connecticut, where Borgnine attended public school in New Haven. Upon graduating from high school, in 1935, he joined the Navy as an apprentice seaman.

After 10 years in service, Borgnine returned to Connecticut and continued his education by enrolling at the Randall School of Dramatic Art in Hartford. Beginning in 1946, he spent four years honing his craft at the Barter Theatre in Abington, Virginia. While there, Borgnine encountered his first professional acting experience, initially appearing in bit parts, and eventually graduating to starring roles.

The young character actor soon landed a part on Broadway in the comedy Harvey, which led to appearances on New York television shows like Philco Television Playhouse and Captain Video and His Video Rangers. In 1951, he headed west to Hollywood, where he made his feature debut in the docudrama The Whistle at Eaton Falls.

Two years later, Borgnine landed the role of a lifetime in From Here to Eternity, opposite A-list actors Montgomery Clift, Frank Sinatra, Deborah Kerr, and Burt Lancaster. His brutish portrayal of Fatso Judson earned him critical acclaim and established him as a bankable actor.With the success of the film, Hecht-Lancaster Productions signed Borgnine to a seven-year contract.

Borgnine soon found himself typecast as a brooding villain in such roles as Strabo in 1954's Roman epic Demetrius and the Gladiators, opposite Susan Hayward and Victor Mature. Later that year, he was placed in similar "tough guy" parts, including Johnny Guitar with Joan Crawford, and the Western Vera Cruz with Gary Cooper.

Ernest Borgnine Biography Current News Profile Wife Husband Fashion Wedding Weightloss Father Mother Fashion Children Movies Relationships Twitter Imdb Family Facebook Myspace Pictures Wallpaper Online Video.Email Address Contact Birthday House Design Eye Hair Tatoo Childhood.

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